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The optimal viewing period for mid-northern latitudes is between and 7 p. Viewed in a telescope inset the planet will exhibit a waning gibbous phase. Look for much brighter Venus sitting seven degrees to Mercury's right. At its last quarter phase, the moon rises around midnight and remains visible in the southern sky all morning.


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At this phase, the moon is illuminated on its western side, towards the pre-dawn sun. Last quarter moons are positioned ahead of the Earth in our trip around the sun. After this phase, the waning moon will traverse the last quarter of its orbit around the earth, on the way to new moon. The annual Orionids meteor shower, composed of debris from repeated passages of Comet Halley, runs from September 23 to November It peaks between midnight and dawn on Tuesday, October At that time the sky overhead is moving directly into the densest region of the particle field, producing fast meteors per hour.

The meteors can appear anywhere in the sky, but will be travelling away from the constellation of Orion. The waning half-illuminated moon will wash out some of the meteors. When the waning, half-illuminated moon rises in the eastern sky after shortly before 1 a. The moon's orbital motion green line will carry it several degrees away from the cluster by dawn, but both objects will fit within the field of view of binoculars red circle. For best results, position the moon outside of the lower left of your binoculars' field of view and look for the cluster's myriad stars.

Hours earlier, observers in Europe and Asia can witness the moon crossing just above the cluster's center. The "Demon Star" Algol in Perseus is among the most accessible variable stars for beginner skywatchers. Its naked-eye brightness dims noticeably for about 10 hours once every 2 days, 20 hours, and 49 minutes. That happens because a dim companion star orbiting nearly edge-on to Earth crosses in front of the much brighter main star.

On Friday, October 25 at p. EDT, Algol will reach its minimum brightness of magnitude 3. At that time, it will be positioned partway up the northeastern horizon. By a. EDT, Algol will be approaching the zenith and will have brightened to its usual magnitude of 2. For about half an hour before dawn during moonless periods in September and October annually, the steep morning ecliptic favors the appearance of the zodiacal light in the eastern sky.

This is reflected sunlight from interplanetary particles concentrated in the plane of the solar system. During the two-week period that starts just before the October new moon, look above the eastern horizon, below the stars of Leo, for a broad wedge of faint light rising from the horizon and centered on the ecliptic marked by green line. Don't confuse it with the Milky Way, which is sitting further to the southeast.


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  • In the eastern sky between about a. At its new phase, the moon is traveling between Earth and the sun. Since sunlight can only reach the far side of the moon, and the moon is in the same region of the sky as the sun, the moon will be completely hidden from view. Uranus will reach opposition on Monday, October On that night it will be closest to Earth for this year — 1.

    Its minimal distance from Earth will cause it to shine at a peak brightness of magnitude 5.

    At opposition, planets are visible all night. During autumn this year, the blue-green planet will be moving retrograde westwards, towards the constellation of Pisces. In the southwestern sky after sunset on Tuesday, October 29, the young crescent moon will be positioned four degrees above to the celestial northeast of the bright planet Venus.

    Both objects will fit within the field of view of binoculars red circle. Take note of Mercury sitting just less than six degrees below the moon. Low in the southwestern sky on the evenings around Wednesday, October 30, speedy Mercury's motion sunward will carry it past much brighter Venus. At closest approach on October 30, Mercury will be positioned 2. In the southwestern sky on the evening of Thursday, October 31, the waxing crescent moon will be positioned four degrees to the upper left or celestial east of Jupiter. The pair will fit together in the field of view of binoculars red circle and will set after p.

    Look for the magnitude 8. Have a news tip, correction or comment? For example, in New Zealand you can almost capture it completely vertical. In February, you can also capture the Galactic Center in the Northern Hemisphere: you see it low, near the horizon And also during the New Moon, you can capture Star Trails , whose pattern depends on your latitude and the direction to which you point your camera at. Mercury's orbit is closer to the Sun than that of the Earth, which means that it always appears close to the Sun and is faded because of the Sun's brightness most of the time.

    You can only observe it for a few days each time it reaches its greatest separation from the Sun greatest elongation. This phenomenon repeats itself approximately once every months and occurs alternately during the morning or afternoon, depending on whether Mercury is to the east or west of the Sun. The best time to photograph Mercury is shortly after sunset. March… Finally! At last!

    Throughout the month the visibility of the Galactic Center is longer all over the world, multiplying the photographic opportunities :. You can also capture the zodiacal light. Depending on where you are, in India for example, you may find the Galactic Center near the horizon and capture a spectacular panorama. And if you're a little further south, like Australia's west coast where the skies have no light pollution, you can get an amazing vertical….

    Always referring to locations in the Southern Hemisphere, two other galaxies that you can observe with the naked eye! They are relatively close to the south celestial pole, so from a certain latitude both can become circumpolar. They are located towards the south. The New Moon also gives you the perfect opportunity to capture Star Trails. Did you know that depending on your location and the direction to which you point your camera at, Star Trails can change their shape?

    The March equinox is at UTC. This is also the first spring day spring equinox in the Northern Hemisphere and the first fall day fall equinox in the Southern Hemisphere. Jupiter passes at 1. Saturn passes at 0. The occultation is visible across the Indian Ocean, southern Africa and the eastern coast of Brazil. Mars passes att 3. April is a relatively quiet month, but pay attention because the night sky always offers interesting photographic opportunities.

    Another very interesting option and that will leave your friends with their mouths wide open you can photograph are Star Trails. Also, at the beginning of the month, you can still capture the zodiacal light. At this time the Moon phase is 9. Mercury passes at 3. At this time the Moon phase is 5. Are you on the west coast of the USA? Or of Mexico? Then you have the perfect opportunity to capture it on the horizon thanks to a panorama.

    And if you're in Chilean Patagonia, for example, you have the Milky Way forming a beautiful diagonal or even a vertical You can also capture Star Trails including the Polaris or the south celestial pole You can create circumpolars, arches, diagonals Mars passes at 4. The best time to photograph Mercury is shortly before sunrise. The Moon is on the opposite side of the Earth so the Sun illuminates it completely. Full Moon is at UTC.

    Astronomical Calendar of Celestial Events Throughout 12222

    Full Moon days are perfect for photographing it with an interesting subject. Get the most out of the Full Moon with this article. But the best night for photographing it is the one between April 22 and The peak is on April 23 at UTC with 20 meteors per hour. This Meteor Shower is visible from both hemispheres. Stay tuned because May is a month full of astronomical events. Write them in your diary so you don't miss a single one And don't forget to keep in mind the New Moon week. It offers a fantastic opportunity to capture the Galactic Center of the Milky Way May is a great month for it!

    You can also try taking pictures of Star Trails. The results are amazing and you can play with your creativity in many ways. This year there are good conditions to photograph the Eta Aquariids. There is hardly any Moon so all you have to do is find a suitable location no light pollution to capture the show. And if you can treat yourself with a trip to New York, Manhattanhenge is a very curious and tremendously photogenic phenomenon that occurs approximately three weeks before and after the June solstice. Venus passes at 3. At this time the Moon phase is 6. Mercury passes at 2. From Spain for example, you can capture a beautiful diagonal with the Galactic Center shining.

    You can also capture Star Trails. However, take care of your composition because often times the foreground is as important or more than the background. So take a good look at the sky, how you're going to paint with the stars, and how you're going to combine those trails with a catching subject. But the best night for photographing it is the one between May 6 and 7. The peak is on May 6 at UTC with 55 meteors per hour. Although it's best visible in the Southern Hemisphere.

    In the Northern Hemisphere it has a lower intensity. Mars passes at 3. Conversely, if you're in the Southern Hemisphere, make the most of the long winter nights. They're perfect for capturing tack sharp stars! June is a perfect month to do so in both hemispheres. At this time the Moon phase is 2. From Patagonia, where the skies are extremely clean, you can capture a beautiful vertical. And from the USA you have the option of capturing a panorama at the beginning of the night and a vertical one before sunrise ;.

    At this time the Moon phase is 1.

    Celestial Events Calendar

    Mars passes at 1. Venus passes at 5. Unfortunately, the cluster is not clearly and completely visible at this time of year. You can only glimpse it if you are at equatorial latitudes or near the Tropic of Capricorn south of the equator , slightly above the horizon just before dawn.

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    At UTC, Jupiter is at its closest approach to Earth and its visible face is completely illuminated by the Sun at a magnitude of This is the best time to observe and photograph Jupiter and its four largest moons, which appear as bright spots on both sides of the planet. However, even being at its closest approach to the Earth, you can only distinguish Jupiter as a star-shaped spot of light with the naked eye. Use a pair of good binoculars to see the planet more clearly as a light spot along with its moons.

    Mercury is at a magnitude of 0. The occultation is visible in southern South America and southern Africa. The June solstice is at UTC. This is also the first summer day summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere and the first winter day winter solstice in the Southern Hemisphere. In July is full of surprises that go beyond the usual events that occur at this time of year If you don't have the chance to be close to where they happen, make the most out of the days around the New Moon and look for locations: July is a great month to photograph the Galactic Center of the Milky Way.

    Or would you prefer to work on creating Star Trails? Have you ever captured a circumpolar? Then it's a good time to try. Totality occurs at UTC. Although this information depends on your position within the path of totality. So use PhotoPills to plan in detail the total solar eclipse. The path of totality is only visible in the southern Pacific Ocean, central Chile and central Argentina.

    The partial eclipse is visible in most of the southern Pacific Ocean and in western South America. Please be cautious and use a solar filter along with a pair of solar eclipse glasses if you plan to observe or photograph the total solar eclipse of the Sun. To learn how to plan and photograph the solar eclipse, take a look at our detailed guide to solar eclipses.

    At this time the Moon phase is 4. Mercury is at a magnitude of 1. At UTC, Saturn is at its closest approach to Earth and its visible face is completely illuminated by the Sun at a magnitude of 0. This is almost the maximum inclination they can have so you can clearly observe them. However, even being at its closest approach to the Earth, you can only distinguish Saturn as a star-shaped spot of light with the naked eye.

    Use a telescope to see the planet along with its rings. Moreover, in certain areas of the Earth, the Moon passes through the Earth's shadow, creating a partial lunar eclipse from to UTC. The maximum lunar eclipse occurs at UTC. It happens on July 16 or 17 depending on your longitude e. Use PhotoPills to learn more about the partial lunar eclipse in your location section But the best night for photographing it is the one between July 30 and The peak is on July 30 at UTC with 20 meteors per hour. Unfortunately, this year one of the most popular events photographically speaking, the Perseids, are hardly visible.

    The peak date of this Meteor Shower is very close to the Full Moon. So the sky is too bright At the end of August, the zodiacal light is visible again. As for Star Trails , you know they are a photographic opportunity I love to play with. They are always the perfect excuse to go out and take pictures at night. And as I suggest you every month, you can also capture Star Trails. But the best night for photographing it is the one between August 12 and The peak is on August 13 at UTC with meteors per hour. The days around New Moon are great for photographing the night sky.

    This is the second New Moon of August, something that only occurs in this month throughout And, as always, don't forget the Star Trails They'll help you get magical images! Moreover, this month marks a change of season, from summer to fall in the Northern Hemisphere and from winter to spring in the Southern Hemisphere. Here you have the complete list of the most important celestial events happening in September At UTC, Neptune is at its closest approach to Earth and its visible face is completely illuminated by the Sun at a magnitude of 7.

    This is the best time to observe and photograph Neptune. However, even being at its closest approach to the Earth, you can only distinguish Neptune as a star-shaped spot of light with the naked eye. Use a telescope to see the planet. The September equinox is at UTC. This is also the first fall day fall equinox in the Northern Hemisphere and the first spring day spring equinox in the Southern Hemisphere.

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    After the September equinox, the different parts of the world are gradually changing seasons. In the Northern Hemisphere, first comes fall and then winter. Conversely, in the Southern Hemisphere first comes spring and then summer. October is a month with two very interesting Meteor Showers: the Draconids and the Orionids At the beginning of October you can still capture the zodiacal light. And finally, hurry up! This is the second-to-last month in which you can photograph the Galactic Center of the Milky Way above the horizon. Although you can always capture Star Trails! Here you have the complete list of the most important celestial events happening in October But the best night for photographing it is the one between October 21 and The peak is on October 21 at UTC with 20 meteors per hour.

    At UTC, Uranus is at its closest approach to Earth and its visible face is completely illuminated by the Sun at a magnitude of 5. This is the best time to observe and photograph Uranus. However, even being at its closest approach to the Earth, you can only distinguish Uranus as a star-shaped spot of light with the naked eye. So you have to take advantage of its reduced visibility time.

    Another option is to focus on other types of images, such as creating Star Trails. Unfortunately, the Leonids are relatively weak 15 meteors per hour and the Moon is not helping as well Here you have the complete list of the most important celestial events happening in November The occultation is visible in New Zealand. This event is very rare and occurs once every many years. Mercury's next solar transit will not take place until November 13, If you want to observe and photograph this spectacle, make sure you have a telescope, a solar filter and a pair of solar eclipse glasses.

    In Canada, Mexico, the rest of the USA, most of Europe, the Middle East, New Zealand and the rest of Africa only part of the transit is visible, as the beginning or end of the transit occurs before sunrise or after sunset. Have a look at the visibility map, local times and other details of the transit of Mercury across the Sun. But the best night for photographing it is the one between November 17 and The peak is on November 18 at UTC with 15 meteors per hour. Mercury passes at 1.

    Jupiter passes at 0. At this time of year the Galactic Center is above the horizon when it is daylight. As for the Geminids, they are usually very intense meteors per hour producing a spectacular Meteor Shower. The problem this year is that the Moonphase that night is But don't be discouraged because this month brings other photographic opportunities that are worthwhile. Also, don't forget about Star Trails because it's a type of astrophotography that you can practice all year round. If you want, you can check the comet's path. Here you have the complete list of the most important celestial events happening in December But the best night for photographing it is the one between December 14 and The peak is on December 14 at UTC with meteors per hour.

    The December solstice is at UTC. This is also the first winter day winter solstice in the Northern Hemisphere and the first summer day summer solstice in the Southern Hemisphere. But the best night for photographing it is the one between December 22 and The peak is on December 23 at UTC with 10 meteors per hour.

    You have all the information you need in our Meteor Shower guide. The days around New Moon are great for photographing the night sky and Star Trails.

    Import these events into your calendar

    In December the Galactic Center of the Milky Way is no longer visible, but you can photograph is the thinnest part of the arch of our galaxy. The maximum annular eclipse occurs at UTC. Use PhotoPills to learn more about the annular solar eclipse at your location section At this time the Moon phase is 8. The occultation is visible in the south of South America.

    And now that you know everything absolutely everything!

    That's what we PhotoPillers say photography and PhotoPills freaks We even designed a t-shirt so we don't forget it :P. With the help of the calendar, you chose the astronomical event you want to photograph And you have let your imagination run wild, trying to create in your mind a great picture a legendary one if possible.

    Well, the time has come to go from the idea to reality, to check that the photo you dream of is possible! And to do so, the best thing is to use PhotoPills , a tool that you can easily master reading the super user guide and watching these video tutorials :P. But if you manage to do it in the way and the location you want, the result is even more rewarding. That's why planning is so important. Although it's a few years old, this video is still valid. Here Rafa explains to you step by step the whole workflow that we follow.

    In addition to this, at the end of this section I have added a link to a more recent video detailing another example of Milky Way planning. Anyway, if you need a more detailed explanation, you can read the planning section in the Milky Way guide. Or if you prefer, you can see Rafa's explanation using a real case: the Milky Way arching over the Vingerklip Namibia. If this explanation is not enough and you need more details, read the article 'How to plan the next Full Moon' and understand why the shooting spot determines the size of the Moon relative to the size of the subject.

    And if you already know the shooting spot and want to quickly find out when the Moon will be where you want it, use the Search option. In this article Rafa explains how to do it: 'How to find Moonrises and Moonsets'. When you're planning any Meteor Shower picture, there's one element you need to consider: the radiant. The radiant is a point in the sky from which meteors seem to radiate. Or, if you prefer, sprout XD. Each radiant is located in the constellation that gives its name to the Meteor Shower.

    For example, the Perseids radiant is located in the Perseus constellation. Our Meteor Showers guide let you know the radiants of the most spectacular Meteor Showers. Even though you don't have to include the radiant in your composition, I like to do it because the effect you get is spectacular. So let's see how to plan your photo, including how to locate the radiant in the sky. To do that, let's take the Quadrantids for example. If you want to know more about Meteor Showers and the mysterious radiant, take a look at the Meteor Showers guide that we publish every year.

    This is how you can plan the total lunar eclipse of January 21, If you follow these simple steps you will be able to plan almost any lunar eclipse photo you can imagine If you want to learn much more about how to plan your own photos of a lunar eclipse, take a look at the lunar eclipses guide. This is how you can plan the total solar eclipse of July 2, If you follow these simple steps you will be able to plan almost any solar eclipse photo that you imagine If you want to learn in much more detail how to plan your own photos of a solar eclipse, take a look at the solar eclipses guide.

    If you're an advanced PhotoPiller, you can also choose to plan it from home. You can read everything about how to plan a Star Trails photo in the Star Trails guide. The conjunction between a planet and the Moon occurs when you have the impression that they are very close to each other while observing them from the Earth. This phenomenon occurs because both stars are in the same celestial longitude.

    Throughout there are many conjunctions between a planet and the Moon. You can find details of each one of them in this guide's monthly calendar. If you to want to photograph one of them, you should plan it first. It will help you know all the information you need to take the picture. And to explain how you can plan this type of photos, the best thing is to use an example. Since the Moon is involved in the conjunction, let's find out where the Moon will be on the day and time of the conjunction. But you can use a free program called Stellarium to plan your photos before a conjunction of planets occurs.

    In the previous section I have recommended you Stellarium , a free program to make simulations of the celestial vault. You can observe all kinds of celestial bodies and astronomical objects: planets, satellites, asteroids, meteors and comets, among others. Therefore, I recommend that you install it on your computer and look for the comet you want to photograph. Stellarium will give you the date and time when that particular comet will be visible or not.